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Resume:


Pharis E. Williams



EDUCATION:
High School                1959    Southwest R5, Washburn, Mo
BSEE                          1968    University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
MS, Physics                1976    Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA

HONORS:
Listed in Marque's Who's Who in the West, 1980.
Listed in The Directory of Distinguished Americans, 1983.
Listed in the 20th edition of the Dictionary of International Biography.
Listed in Men of Achievement, 1986.
Listed in Platinum Edition of the Who's Who Worldwide Registry
Listed in the National Register’s Who’s Who in Executives and Professionals

POSITIONS HELD:
1959 - 1964         Electrician's Mate on various Navy ships as E-1 through E-6 Serviceman
1964 - 1968         Student, U. of Colorado, Boulder, Co., advanced to Chief Electrician's Mate
1968 - 1972         Naval officer on various Navy ships and staffs, with ranks of Ensign through Lieutenant
1972 - 1974         Curriculum Officer for Surface Weapons, Nuclear Weapons Training Center, Pacific
1974 - 1976         Student, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA
1976 - 1978         Instructor, U.S. Naval Academy, advanced to Lieutenant Commander
1978 - 1983         Naval Research Associate, Sr. Navy Representative, DoD Program Manager, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
1983 - 1985         President, Williams Research Corporation
1985 - 1992         Assistant Director, Center for Explosives Technology Research;
                            Associate Director, Research Center for Energetic Materials;
                            Group Leader of Explosive Devices Research, CETR
1992-1997           Associate Director, Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
                            Associate Director, Research Center for Energetic Materials
1997-1998           Director, Counter Terrorist Explosives Center/Counter Proliferation

    1. Program Manager of the TedibeAr program
    2. President, Williams Research Corporation

2006-present       Williams Research, consultant

HIGHLIGHTS OF ACHIEVEMENTS:
USS Brooke DEG-1, U.S. Navy (1969-70)
Redesigned gas baffles for the Navy's pressure fired steam generators to eliminate the tube breakage problem experienced by new boiler designs.
Nuclear Training Group, Pacific, U.S. Navy (1972-74)
Conducted theoretical investigations into nuclear weapons design pointing out a needed design change for increased safety and guided experimental and numerical calculation efforts which supported these theoretical findings.
Naval Postgraduate School (1974-76)
Determined the fundamental basis and conducted the initial development of a new physical theory called the Dynamic Theory.
U.S. Naval Academy (1976-78)
Taught thermodynamics and shipboard engineering courses to junior and senior level midshipmen.  Continued developing the Dynamic Theory, expanding it to include the five dimensions and initiating the five-dimensional quantization.
Los Alamos National Laboratory (1978-83)
Conducted, and supervised the conduction of, shockwave experiments using explosives and powder driven shock guns. Used state-of-the-art VISAR, and digital recording, instrumentation to investigate the shock wave emerging from materials.  Developed a subminiature piezoelectric quartz gauge and a low cost differential timer with an accuracy of ±25 ps and other instrumentation equipment and methods. Continued the theoretical development, showing that all current physical theories except the General Theory of Relativity were subsets of the Dynamic Theory.  Conceived and obtained funds for initial tests of a novel, classified Electron Directed Energy warhead which used the energy contained in explosives to generate and accelerate electrons.  Assisted in the management of DoD programs.
Williams Research Corporation (1983-85) 
Marketed a capability to conduct theoretical research, conducted and oversaw such research.  Conducted a theoretical design of a novel communication antenna system for a major U.S. DoD contractor.   Conceived and proposed a concept for a non-nuclear, Neutron Directed Energy Warhead in response to the "Star Wars" speech.  Showed that the Dynamic Theory predicted the advance of the perihelion of planetary orbits as well as the General Theory of Relativity. Conducted contract research for various intelligence agencies.
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1985-92) 
Assisted in the development of the Center for Explosives Technology Research (CETR) at New Mexico Tech.  Supervised the construction, equipping, and operation of its Eagle Field Laboratory where large explosive charges may be fired while high-speed optical and electronic instrumentation record the desired data. Designed the Torres' Small Scale Safety Testing and Explosives Processing laboratory.  Responding to a request to create a power supply for a one-shot x-ray that will be used at remote locations, invented and developed the concept of a propellant driven, magnetic flux compression generator.  As Assistant Director for CETR, assisted the Director in managing the day to day operation of CETR and assumed the Director's responsibilities during his many absences on travel or vacation.  As Explosives Devices Group Leader, supervised and actively participated in the research and testing of explosives and explosives devices, and supervised scientists and technical personnel.  As Associate Director for RCEM, assumed the duties of the Director during his absences, served on the membership recruitment and retention committee and submitted research proposals to work with member companies on specific problems.
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1992-1997)
Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC); Associate Director for Research and Development, Executive Officer for Marketing; Associate Director for the Research Center for Energetic Materials (RCEM).  Provided management, direction, and leadership for the center's research and development activities, specifically assuming the increased responsibilities of supervising three groups in the areas of explosives chemistry, theoretical and computational physics, and the advanced development of applications of explosives.  Marketed EMRTC's R&D capabilities and coordinates the full EMRTC marketing effort.  Duties for RCEM are essentially the same as those listed above.  In addition to these executive duties, responsibilities included acting as Principle Investigator for a multiple year contract for the Defense Nuclear Agency guiding the technical effort studying the potential of the Minuteman III propellant to undergo a Deflagration-to-Detonation transition.  Continued developing the detonation modeling of non-ideal explosives and the multiple -reaction rate modeling needed for these materials.
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1997-1998)
Director, Counter Terrorist Explosives Center/Counter Proliferation.  Provided the proposal, sponsor follow-up, technical basis, and program structure needed to establish the Counter Terrorist Explosive Center (CTEC).  Provide the management, direction, and leadership for the CTEC.  Conducted the marketing, sponsor contact and follow-up on various Counter Proliferation programs.  One program has initial funding in the Senate FY 98 authorization bill for a $5 million - 18 month program.  Another program, which is a $63 million - 5 year effort, has been penciled into the FY 99 budget.  Hosted an International Workshop on Non-Ideal Explosives.
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1998-2001)
Program Manager of the TedibeAr Program.  Provided the program management and technical guidance of this basic technology development program intended to investigate the ability of this technology to provide an innovative way of countering weapons of mass destruction.  The development team includes Texas A&M University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Cornell University, and Applied Pulsed Power, Inc.  Conducted research in experimentally determining the time dependence in the energy release of non-ideal explosives.  Conducted theoretical research resulting in showing that the Quantum Principle put forward by Weyl in 1929 requires a generalization of the Yang-Mills fields for the interaction of two particles, a generalization of the Su(3) group for the description of three particle systems, and a quantum gravity which has Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity as a subset.
Williams Research Corporation (2001-present) 
Providing analysis and consulting on explosives and their effects.  Conducting theoretical investigations and new applications for weapons, lasers and communications.
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (2001-present)
Adjunct faculty teaching graduate level classes in detonation theory.

PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS:
1.  Williams, P.E., 1976, "On a Possible Formulation of Particle Dynamics in Terms of Thermo- dynamic Conceptualizations and the Role of Entropy in it," thesis, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.
2.  Williams, P.E., 1977, "The Principles of the Dynamic Theory," Research Report EW-77-4, U.S. Naval Academy.
3.  Williams, P.E., 1980, "The Dynamic Theory: A New View of Space, Time, and Matter," Los Alamos National Lab report LA-8370-MS, December.
4.  Williams, P.E., 1981, "The Dynamic Theory: Some Shockwave and Energy Implications," Los Alamos National Lab report LA-8402-MS, February.
5.  Williams, P.E., 1981, "The Arrow of Time in the Dynamic Theory," Los Alamos National Lab report LA-8690-MS, February.
6.  Carden, A.E., P.E. Williams, and R.R. Karpp, 1981, "Comparison of Flow Curves of 6061 Aluminum Alloy at High and Low Strain Rates," published in Shock Waves and High-Strain-Rate Phenomena in Metals, ed. M.A. Meyers and L.E. Murr, Plenum Press.
7.  Williams, P.E., 1983, "The Nuclear Model from the Dynamic Theory,"  presented  at  the Third Annual Southwest Theoretical Physics Conference, at University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, March.
8.  Williams, P.E., 1983, "The Possible Unifying Effect of the Dynamic Theory," Los Alamos National Lab report LA-9623-MS, May.
9.  Williams, P.E., 1983, "The Potential of the Dynamic Theory in Modeling Electro-magnetic Effects on Biological Systems," presented at the Conference on "Non-Ionizing Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation on Biological Systems," at Veterans Hospital, Loma Linda, CA, May.
10.  Williams, P.E., 1987, "Neutron Directed Energy Warhead," invited presentation at the Sixth DoD Conference on DEW Vulnerability, Survivability, and Effects, Reston, VA.
11.  Williams, P.E., 1989, "Space, Time and Mass," Center for Explosives Technology Research Report A-07-89, May.
12.  Williams, P.E., 1989, "An Introduction to the Propellant-Driven Magnetic Flux Compression Generator," Center for Explosives Technology Research Report A-10-89, August.
13.  Williams, P.E., 1992, "A Mechanical Sensitization Model of Composite Explosives," invited presentation at the 18th Annual SEE Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques, Orlando, FL.
14.  Williams, P.E., 1992, "An Introduction to Magnetic Flux Compression in a Gun," Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Intense Dynamic Loading and its Effects, June 9-12, 1992, Chengdu, China.
15.  Williams, P.E., 1994, "The Importance of the Reaction Rate Laws in Modeling DDT", proceeding of the JANNAF  Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee meeting, 1-4 August, 1994, San Diego, CA.
16.  Williams, P.E., "Reaction Rate Law for Emulsion Explosives as a Function of Cell and Micro Balloon Size", submitted to the 21st Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques, Nashville, TN, 5-9 February, 1995
17.  McKown, T.O., Eilers, D.D., and Williams, P.E., "Explosive Performance Measurements on Large, Multiple-Hole Arrays and Large Masses of Conventional Explosive", submitted to the 21st Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques, Nashville, TN, 5-9 February, 1995
18.  Williams, P. E., “The Influence of the Reaction Rate of Explosives on Blast Effects,” Conference of the Am. Phy. Soc. Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, Seattle, WA, August 13-18, 1995.
19.  Williams, P.E., “The Influence of the Reaction Rate of Explosives on Blast Effects,” 5th International Symposium on the Analysis and Detection of Explosives,” 4-8 Dec., 1995.
20.  Romero, V. and Williams, P. E., “The Characterization of Non-Ideal Explosives,” Specialty Symposium on Structures Response to Impact and Blast, Tel Aviv, 6-10 October, 1996.
21.  Romero, V. and Williams, P. E., “Blast Waves from Non-Ideal Explosives,” Conference of the Am. Phy. Soc. Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, Amherst, MS, 28 July-1 August, 1997.
22.  Williams, P.E., “Quantum Measurement, Gravitation, and Locality in the Dynamic Theory,” Symposium on Causality and Locality in Modern Physics and Astronomy: Open Questions and Possible Solutions, York University, North York, Canada, August 25-29, 1997.
23.  Williams, P.E., “Thermodynamic Basis for the Constancy of the Speed of Light,” Modern Physics Letters A, Vol.12, No. 35 (1997) 2725-2738.
24.  Goldman, E. B., Williams, P. E., and Stanley, M., “A Propellant-Driven Flux Compression Power Unit for Millisecond ETC Pulsed Power Applications,” IEEE,1999
25.       Romero, V. and Williams, P.E., "The Characterization of Non‑Ideal Explosives," Technology, Vol. 7, pp. 99‑103, 2000.


26.    Freeman, B., Deninger, W., Faehl, R., Glidden, S., Greenly, J., Luginbill, A., Oona, H., Rock, J., Shannon, J. And Williams, P., “Experimental Results from a Dynamic Magnetic Field Controlled Ion Ring,” 27th IEEE International Conf on Plasma Science, 2000.
27.    Rock, J. C., Freeman, B. L., Williams, P. E., and Greenly, J. “Ion Trajectories in a Coaxial Ion Diode With Magnetic Confinement, and an Axial Anode Surrounded by a Magnetically Insulated Cylindrical Cathode,” 27th IEEE International Conf on Plasma Science, 2000.

  1. Williams, P.E., “Using the Hubble Telescope to Determine the Split of a Cosmological

Object’s Redshift in its Gravitational and  Distance Parts,”  Apeiron , Vol. 8, No. 2 (April 2001) http://redshift.vif.com/JournalFiles/V08NO2PDF/V08N2WIL.pdf
29.       Williams, P.E., Abernathy, R., Banks, M., “Characteristics of Non-Ideal HE Explosive Products,” 2nd. International Workshop on Non-Ideal Explosives, 2001.

  1. Williams, P.E., “Mechanical Entropy and its Implications,” Entropy 2001, 3, 76-115. http://www.mdpi.org/entropy/list01.htm#new
  2. Josephson, L.H. and Williams, P.E., “Ballistic Pendulum and Free-Air Blast Pressure Comparison,” 2nd. International Workshop on Non-Ideal Explosives, 2001.
  3. Williams, P. E., “Energy and Entropy as the Fundaments of Theoretical Physics,” Entropy 2002, 4, 128-141. http://www.mdpi.org/entropy/htm/e4040128.htm
  4. Williams, P. E., “Application of Nanotechnology to Ammonium Nitrate Emulsion Mining Explosives,”  China International Conference Nanoscience and Technology, Shanghai, China, June, 2005
  5. Williams, P. E., “Aluminum Reactions in an Ammonium Nitrate Emulsion Explosive,” International Autumn Symposium on Pyrotechnics, Explosives and Propellants, Beijing, China, October 2005.
  6. Williams, P. E., “Alternate Communications for Space Travel,” Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF-2007), Albuquerque, NM, February 11-15, 2007.
  7. Williams, P. E., “Compact Reactor,” Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF-2007), Albuquerque, NM, February 11-15, 2007.
  8. Williams, P. E., “Large Diameter Plane Wave Lens Made from Non-Ideal Explosives,” 2007 International Autumn Symposium on Propellants, Explosives and Pyrotechnics, Xi’an, China, 23-26 October 2007
  9. Williams, P. E., “The Time Dependent Reactive Hydrodynamic Equations and the Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition,” 2007 International Autumn Symposium on Propellants, Explosives and Pyrotechnics, Xi’an, China, 23-26 October 2007
  10. Williams, P. E., “New Time Dependent Gravity Displays Dark Matter and Dark Energy Effects,” Apeiron Vol. 15, No. 3 (July 2008) http://redshift.vif.com/JournalFiles/V15NO3PDF/V15N3WIL.pdf

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